Tag Archives: kernel

Linux Security Summit 2016 Schedule Published

The schedule for the 2016 Linux Security Summit is now published!

The keynote speaker for this year’s event is Julia Lawall.  Julia is a research scientist at Inria, the developer of Coccinelle, and the Linux Kernel coordinator for the Outreachy project.

Refereed presentations include:

See the schedule for the full list of talks.

Also included are updates from Linux kernel security subsystem maintainers, and snacks.

The event this year is co-located with LinuxCon North America in Toronto, and will be held on the 25th and 26th of August.  Standalone registration for the Linux Security Summit is $100 USD: click here to register.

You can also follow updates and news for the event via Twitter:  @LinuxSecSummit
See you there!

LSM Mailing List Being Archived Again

Several folks noticed that all of the known LSM mailing list archives stopped archiving earlier this year.  We don’t know why and generally have not had any luck contacting the owners of several archives, including marc and gmane.  This is a concern, because the list is generally where Linux kernel security takes place and it’s important to have a public record of it.

The good news is that Paul Moore was finally able to re-register the list with mail-archive.com, and there is once again an active archive here: http://www.mail-archive.com/linux-security-module@vger.kernel.org/

Please update any links you may have!

Linux Security Summit 2015 – Wrapup, slides

The slides for all of the presentations at last week’s Linux Security Summit are now available at the schedule page.

Thanks to all of those who participated, and to all the events folk at Linux Foundation, who handle the logistics for us each year, so we can focus on the event itself.

As with the previous year, we followed a two-day format, with most of the refereed presentations on the first day, with more of a developer focus on the second day.  We had good attendance, and also this year had participants from a wider field than the more typical kernel security developer group.  We hope to continue expanding the scope of participation next year, as it’s a good opportunity for people from different areas of security, and FOSS, to get together and learn from each other.  This was the first year, for example, that we had a presentation on Incident Response, thanks to Sean Gillespie who presented on GRR, a live remote forensics tool initially developed at Google.

The keynote by kernel.org sysadmin, Konstantin Ryabitsev, was another highlight, one of the best talks I’ve seen at any conference.

Overall, it seems the adoption of Linux kernel security features is increasing rapidly, especially via mobile devices and IoT, where we now have billions of Linux deployments out there, connected to everything else.  It’s interesting to see SELinux increasingly play a role here, on the Android platform, in protecting user privacy, as highlighted in Jeffrey Vander Stoep’s presentation on whitelisting ioctls.  Apparently, some major corporate app vendors, who were not named, have been secretly tracking users via hardware MAC addresses, obtained via ioctl.

We’re also seeing a lot of deployment activity around platform Integrity, including TPMs, secure boot and other integrity management schemes.  It’s gratifying to see the work our community has been doing in the kernel security/ tree being used in so many different ways to help solve large scale security and privacy problems.  Many of us have been working for 10 years or more on our various projects  — it seems to take about that long for a major security feature to mature.

One area, though, that I feel we need significantly more work, is in kernel self-protection, to harden the kernel against coding flaws from being exploited.  I’m hoping that we can find ways to work with the security research community on incorporating more hardening into the mainline kernel.  I’ve proposed this as a topic for the upcoming Kernel Summit, as we need buy-in from core kernel developers.  I hope we’ll have topics to cover on this, then, at next year’s LSS.

We overlapped with Linux Plumbers, so LWN was not able to provide any coverage of the summit.  Paul Moore, however, has published an excellent write-up on his blog. Thanks, Paul!

The committee would appreciate feedback on the event, so we can make it even better for next year.  We may be contacted via email per the contact info at the bottom of the event page.

Linux Security Summit 2015 Schedule Published

The schedule for the 2015 Linux Security Summit is now published!

The refereed talks are:

  • CC3: An Identity Attested Linux Security Supervisor Architecture – Greg Wettstein, IDfusion
  • SELinux in Android Lollipop and Android M – Stephen Smalley, NSA
  • Linux Incident Response – Mike Scutt and Tim Stiller, Rapid7
  • Assembling Secure OS Images – Elena Reshetova, Intel
  • Linux and Mobile Device Encryption – Paul Lawrence and Mike Halcrow, Google
  • Security Framework for Constraining Application Privileges – Lukasz Wojciechowski, Samsung
  • IMA/EVM: Real Applications for Embedded Networking Systems – Petko Manolov, Konsulko Group, and Mark Baushke, Juniper Networks
  • Ioctl Command Whitelisting in SELinux – Jeffrey Vander Stoep, Google
  • IMA/EVM on Android Device – Dmitry Kasatkin, Huawei Technologies

There will be several discussion sessions:

  • Core Infrastructure Initiative – Emily Ratliff, Linux Foundation
  • Linux Security Module Stacking Next Steps – Casey Schaufler, Intel
  • Discussion: Rethinking Audit – Paul Moore, Red Hat

Also featured are brief updates on kernel security subsystems, including SELinux, Smack, AppArmor, Integrity, Capabilities, and Seccomp.

The keynote speaker will be Konstantin Ryabitsev, sysadmin for kernel.org.  Check out his Reddit AMA!

See the schedule for full details, and any updates.

This year’s summit will take place on the 20th and 21st of August, in Seattle, USA, as a LinuxCon co-located event.  As such, all Linux Security Summit attendees must be registered for LinuxCon. Attendees are welcome to attend the Weds 19th August reception.  ETA: standalone LSS registration is available.

Hope to see you there!

Hiring Subsystem Maintainers

The regular LWN kernel development stats have been posted here for version 4.1 (if you really don’t have a subscription, email me for a free link).  In this, Jon Corbet notes:

over 60% of the changes going into this kernel passed through the hands of developers working for just five companies. This concentration reflects a simple fact: while many companies are willing to support developers working on specific tasks, the number of companies supporting subsystem maintainers is far smaller. Subsystem maintainership is also, increasingly, not a job for volunteer developers..

As most folks reading this would know, I lead the mainline Linux Kernel team at Oracle.  We do have several people on the team who work in leadership roles in the kernel community (myself included), and what I’d like to make clear is that we are actively looking to support more such folk.

If you’re a subsystem maintainer (or acting in a comparable leadership role), please always feel free to contact me directly via email to discuss employment possibilities.  You can also contact Oracle kernel folk who may be presenting or attending Linux conferences.

Linux Security Summit 2015 CFP

The CFP for the 2015 Linux Security Summit (LSS) is now open: see here.

Proposals are due by June 5th, and accepted speaker notifications will go out by June 12th.

LSS 2015 will be held over 20-21 August, in Seattle, WA, USA.

Last year’s event went really well, and we’ll follow a similar format over two days again this year.  We’re co-located again with LinuxCon, and a host of other events including Linux Plumbers, CloudOpen, KVM Forum, and ContainerCon.  We’ve been upgraded to an LF managed event this year, which means we’ll get food.

All LSS attendees, including speakers, must be registered attendees of LinuxCon.   The first round of early registration ends May 29th.

We’d like to cast our net as wide as possible in terms of presentations, so please share this info with anyone you know who’s been doing interesting Linux security development or implementation work recently.

Linux Security Summit 2014 Schedule Published

The schedule for the 2014 Linux Security Summit (LSS2014) is now published.

The event will be held over two days (18th & 19th August), starting with James Bottomley as the keynote speaker.  The keynote will be followed by referred talks, group discussions, kernel security subsystem updates, and break-out sessions.

The refereed talks are:

  • Verified Component Firmware – Kees Cook, Google
  • Protecting the Android TCB with SELinux – Stephen Smalley, NSA
  • Tizen, Security and the Internet of Things – Casey Schaufler, Intel
  • Capsicum on Linux – David Drysdale, Google
  • Quantifying and Reducing the Kernel Attack Surface –  Anil Kurmus, IBM
  • Extending the Linux Integrity Subsystem for TCB Protection – David Safford & Mimi Zohar, IBM
  • Application Confinement with User Namespaces – Serge Hallyn & Stéphane Graber, Canonical

Discussion session topics include Trusted Kernel Lock-down Patch Series, led by Kees Cook; and EXT4 Encryption, led by Michael Halcrow & Ted Ts’o.   There’ll be kernel security subsystem updates from the SELinux, AppArmor, Smack, and Integrity maintainers.  The break-out sessions are open format and a good opportunity to collaborate face-to-face on outstanding or emerging issues.

See the schedule for more details.

LSS2014 is open to all registered attendees of LinuxCon.  Note that discounted registration is available until the 18th of July (end of this week).

See you in Chicago!

Linux Security Summit 2014 (Chicago) -– Call for Participation

The CFP for the 2014 Linux Security Summit is announced.

LSS 2014 will be co-located with LinuxCon North America in Chicago, on the 18th and 19th of August.  We’ll also be co-located with the Kernel Summit this year.

Note that, as always, we’re looking for participation from the general Linux community — not just kernel people, and not just developers.  We’re interested in hearing about feedback from users, and discussing what kinds of security problems we need to be addressing into the future.

This year, we’re looking for discussion topics as well as paper presentations, so if you have anything interesting to talk about, send in a proposal.

The CFP closes on 6th June 21st June.

Save the Date: 2014 Linux Security Summit in Chicago

The 2014 Linux Security Summit will be held on the 18th and 19th of August, co-located with LinuxCon in Chicago, IL, USA.  The Kernel Summit and several other events will also be co-located there this year.

The Call for Participation will be announced later via the LSM mailing list.